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Bearberry Plant
Bearberry Plant
Bearberry Plant
Bearberry Plant
Bearberry Plant
Bearberry Plant

Bearberry Plant

$9.99

Extremely hardy, Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) is also known as Kinnikinnick is an attractive dense ground cover in situations where few other plants can survive. Spreading gradually by surface rhizomes to form a mat, it grows naturally near sandy beaches, on dry rocky slopes, and open woodlands in sandy or rocky soils. Dainty lantern-shaped white-to-pink fowers appear in mid spring, and last for several weeks. The bright red berries that follow are eaten by birds and small mammals, while the plant itself is deer resistant. Bearberry is a host plant for several butterfly species including Hoary Elfin, Brown Elfin and Freija Fritillary. It has been used as a natural non-clinical treatment for  dysuria, cystitis, urethritis, and kidney and bladder stones. It has also been recommended for inducing diuresis and to treat constipation.

Care

It flourishes in well-drained soil and sunlight, requiring minimal maintenance once established. Its robust nature allows it to withstand various soil conditions, making it a resilient and welcome addition to gardens and naturalistic landscapes. Once established, Bearberry is a highly drought tolerant plant. It requires a well-drained, acid soil with a pH between 4.0 and 6.0 – it will not grow on clay. Established plants do not respond well to being moved, so choose the site well.

Growth Habit

Perfect for rock gardens, Bearberry looks great trailing over a garden wall. Actually a low-growing sub-shrub, the glossy dark green foliage of Bearberry turns a purplish bronze color in the winter and greens-up again in the spring. A single plant can form a bushy dense mat, 6-12 inches high and 3-6 feet wide.

Toxicity
Bearberry is not poisonous to humans, dogs, cats or rabbits.

Extremely hardy, Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) is also known as Kinnikinnick is an attractive dense ground cover in situations where few other plants can survive. Spreading gradually by surface rhizomes to form a mat, it grows naturally near sandy beaches, on dry rocky slopes, and open woodlands in sandy or rocky soils. Dainty lantern-shaped white-to-pink fowers appear in mid spring, and last for several weeks. The bright red berries that follow are eaten by birds and small mammals, while the plant itself is deer resistant. Bearberry is a host plant for several butterfly species including Hoary Elfin, Brown Elfin and Freija Fritillary. It has been used as a natural non-clinical treatment for  dysuria, cystitis, urethritis, and kidney and bladder stones. It has also been recommended for inducing diuresis and to treat constipation.

It flourishes in well-drained soil and sunlight, requiring minimal maintenance once established. Its robust nature allows it to withstand various soil conditions, making it a resilient and welcome addition to gardens and naturalistic landscapes. Once established, Bearberry is a highly drought tolerant plant. It requires a well-drained, acid soil with a pH between 4.0 and 6.0 – it will not grow on clay. Established plants do not respond well to being moved, so choose the site well.

Perfect for rock gardens, Bearberry looks great trailing over a garden wall. Actually a low-growing sub-shrub, the glossy dark green foliage of Bearberry turns a purplish bronze color in the winter and greens-up again in the spring. A single plant can form a bushy dense mat, 6-12 inches high and 3-6 feet wide.

Bearberry is not poisonous to humans, dogs, cats or rabbits.